Who’s responsibility is it anyway? 

Have you ever read an article or watched a video that prompted you to speak up? I experienced this recently when watching the attached video of Simon Sinek from Delta Protective Services. It’s a very informative video about millennials, the impact technology has had on an entire generation, the need for instant gratification, the lack of patience and how it’s now playing out in our workplaces and in society. It’s worth the investment of time to watch through to the end.  

There are many very good points being raised in the video, however, as a leadership and personal development coach, I do not agree with the commentator’s view point that it’s the “corporations” responsibility to fix the problem.  Mr. Sinek is of the opinion that as a result of poor parenting, a dependence on immediacy created by technology, and addictions to social media, millennials have been dealt a bad hand.  He goes on to say employers need to demonstrate good leadership to help this generation in the workplace. Admittedly, these circumstances may have impacted millennials in varying degrees, including developing a dependency on social media, an inability to manage stress, the lack of particular skill sets needed to build meaningful relationships, and in some cases lack of self confidence and the feeling of worth and fulfilment as they move through life.  

Click here to view the video: Millennials

As a leader and coach I’m of the view that responsibility rests with the individual. If I have a problem or see the need to change an aspect of my life which isn’t working for me, then it’s my responsibility to address it. If for example I am addicted to alcohol, have messed up relationships and a lack of self worth as a result of a dysfunctional upbringing, it’s not my employer’s responsibility to fix it. It’s my responsibility. The employer may provide me with an opportunity to go to treatment where I can address the problem, but then recovery is up to me. I think the same applies here. 

Whether you are a millennial or part of another generation, each of us needs to take personal responsibility for addressing whatever challenge we are coming up against. We can blame our parents, technology, society, or some other set of circumstances but when the rubber hits the road, it’s up to the individual to take responsibility for the changes needed to make the best of any given situation.  

Awareness is critical.  I agree employers have a responsibility to demonstrate good leadership by providing meaningful feedback and to support individuals in the workplace.  From there, it’s the individual’s responsibility to take the steps needed to address whatever problem they may be experiencing. That’s how it worked for me. My life has not always been smooth sailing and there have been many instances where I’ve had to take the initiative to overcome personal challenges along the way. That’s how it’s been for most of us.  
The lesson I’ve learned along the way is responsibility for initiating change is an inside job.  

As a leadership and personal development coach I offer services to help individuals and employers develop plans and take concrete steps to overcome obstacles and introduce meaningful change. If you are trudging through life, if your career feels unsatisfying or perhaps you are aware of a skill set needed to help you advance or to turn yourself around, then working with a personal development coach may be right for you. 

St Julien Performance Group provides a free complimentary session to ensure there is a right fit between you and your coach. During the complimentary session I will work with you to identify your individual personal development needs and recommend a course of action. Contact us today!

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Bonnie St Julien

Bonnie St Julien provides personal development and professional leadership coaching and mentoring, to support individuals who aspire to make a positive and meaningful difference in who they are, in what they do and how they do it. Bonnie is an accredited certified Coach and a certified Professional Behaviours (DISC) and Driving Forces (Motivators) Analyst, with over 25 years of public sector management experience, including as an Executive Director. In addition to her professional experience, Bonnie has overcome a number of personal challenges, providing her the determination and inner strength needed to get though whatever life hands her. Bonnie is also an avid motorcyclist who embraces life and lives it fully! Calling on Bonnie's extensive professional and life experience, individuals who work with Bonnie are transformed through the coaching process by gaining self-awareness and by taking incremental concrete action steps to achieve their desired goal and create meaningful and sustainable results in their lives, their work, their organizations, and their world! If you are looking to transform your life, Bonnie is the coach for you!

5 thoughts on “Who’s responsibility is it anyway? 

  1. This is a very good lesson about accepting responsibility for your own direction in life and taking the steps to improve things. Waiting for others to make your life better does not work. Thanks for sharing this Bonnie.

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  2. I loved the video as well. I also felt the same reservation about his contention that it’s now the corporation’s job to “fix the problem”. My interpretation of this contention is that it is the corporate world’s job to point out all these issues to these young folks and provide ways to “help them help themselves” adapt and grow through their personally taking responsibility to correct the “bad hand” they were dealt. The corporate world cannot be held responsible but does need to take some corrective measures if it is to increase its pool of employees for the long term.

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